Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Platitudes from Planet Paul Ryan...

Well, Paul Ryan decided to gather up his endless list of Ryanisms and put them into one Seuss-like book, "The Way Forward."

To get a sense of what you will find in this must read rehash filled with dire warnings and contradictions, behold Ryan's God-like statement of party aggrandizement:
Also out as a children's book.
This can’t be the full measure of our party and our movement. If it is, we’re dead and the country is lost.”
Yes, without the Republican Party, "the country is lost." You see, our big brother authoritarians must convert the U.S. to a one party system to save it, just as the founding fathers envisioned.

Pity the Poor Fool: Ryan shows how little he gets it. While people are repulsed by his cruel Dickensian platform, he thinks it's a "communication" problem:
He acknowledges his communication problems in explaining his budget ideas, which the House Republicans’ campaign arm encouraged candidates to disavow and left Ryan feeling “ostracized.”
Ryan even basks in his own hypocrisy, bragging how having it both ways allows him to see both sides:

While Ryan has faced criticism from Democrats who say he would like to strip social services and make changes to Social Security, Ryan writes that he saw the benefits and importance of the programs in his life. When his father died he received Social Security survivor benefits that allowed him to pay for college. Ryan writes that critics distort his plan.
I suppose it was just a coincidence that so many different critics distorted his "plan" in the exact same way. And Ryan's egocentric vision prevents him from noticing the devolution of his own party:
Ryan singles out the government shutdown in fall 2013 … the government shuttered for 16 days and the Republican brand took a massive hit in voters’ eyes.
Ryan’s in a bad State of Denial: Ryan says past economic failures were the result of bad messaging. If only he had used the right words...:
Ryan says his party needs to be more inclusive, spend far more time talking to black and Latino voters, and avoid playing into what he calls a caricature of the "cold-hearted Republican."
When a constituent once clearly explained the reality and the need for our social safety net programs, instead of getting the point, cold-hearted Ryan questioned his...terminology.
jsonline: He even points to some of his own past rhetoric as part of the problem … his use of the phrase "makers and takers" … The congressman says he began second-guessing his use of that language after a constituent approached him at the Rock County 4-H Fair in July 2012 and asked, "Who are the takers? Is it the person who lost their job and is on unemployment benefits? Is it the person who served in Iraq and gets their medical care through the VA?"

Ryan stopped using the term when he realized that "it sounds like we're saying people who are struggling are deadbeats ... The phrase gave insult where none was intended." 
You know, like his condescending description of the safety nets as hammocks. No insult intended, right? 

Governing, but not Governing?!! In a mind bender, Ryan thinks governing ourselves is different than governing ourselves through government. I’ll admit, this play on words has been a pet peeve of mine for at least a decade. And yet, it makes sense to conservatives. String together just he highlighted words. It's crazy:
Ryan offers a broad attack on progressivism across the decades and a sharp denunciation of Barack Obama as a president whose "policies represent an ideological mission to re-order the human condition through state action, empowering bureaucrats to decide what's best for everyone rather than allowing citizens to govern themselves."
No one wants to decide “what’s best for everyone" except maybe the GOP. No liberal, progressive, or Democrat ever said that, or would say something so ridiculous. That’s a fiction dreamed up by conservative paranoids, who are pushing for a Borg-like one party authority. Talk about irony.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Ryan Wants To Expand A Tax Credit Scott Walker Cut

How radical was one Scott Walker tax 'reform'?

Walker cut a tax credit that put more money into the pockets of low-income wage earners, and thus encouraged work force participation while relieving some of poverty's sting.

The cut to the Earned Income Tax Credit, or EITC, was so mean-spirited and contrary to basic, conservative pro-work GOP agendas that Walker later denied he'd proposed it though the cut remained in his first budget.

But now Ryan, looking to appear more reasonable as the 2016 presidential campaign looms, wants to increase that very same tax credit.

You know a tax 'reform' put forth by an ultra-conservative was toxic if it's too radical for a radical rightist like Paul Ryan.

More information and links, here.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Ryan’s “Opportunity Grant:” Put everyone using Social Safety nets under Contract, penalize them for failure.

You really can't make this stuff up.

With the promise of streamlining all of the different safety net programs and cutting red tape, Paul Ryan has devised an amazingly convoluted solution to his imagine "social hammock" problem.
You can't hide from this one...

Imagine those families struggling to make ends meet, on assistance, and under contract by a “local provider.” Call them a neighborhood "jobs boss." Someone who watches over their every move, wagging a finger and doling out consequences for missing job training benchmarks, income and wage expectations... 

Big government enough for you yet? Working but not making enough and collecting food stamps? Now you have two bosses. And the one that helps you feed your family with food share is hanging a contract over your head…with penalties.

Here's a sample from Ryan's transcript:
Take an example. Let’s call her Andrea. She’s 24. She has two kids … Her husband left … her only work experience was a two-year stint in retail. She and her kids now live with her parents in a two-bedroom mobile home. She’s been trying to find work … She doesn't have a car. She can’t afford child care. And her dream is to become a teacher.

Under this plan, Andrea would go to a local service provider. She would sit down with a case manager and develop an “opportunity plan.” That plan would pinpoint her strengths; her opportunities for growth; her short-, medium-, and long-term goals. The two of them would sign a contract. Andrea would agree to meet specific benchmarks of success, a timeline for meeting them, consequences for missing them, and rewards for exceeding them.
Ryan Spreads Big Government in the form of oversight, more red tape and reporting…
A neutral third party would keep tabs on each provider and their success rate. It would look at key metrics agreed to by the state and federal government: How many people are finding jobs? How many people are getting off assistance? How many people are moving out of poverty? And so on. Any provider who came up short could no longer participate. And at the end of the program, we would pool the results and go from there. 
Here's 7 minutes of absolute lunacy, if you've got the time (edited for time and sanity):


Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Our New Founding Father: Paul Ryan's Orwellian Word Salad Constitution.

What the hell is the "American Idea," part of a new rant by Paul Ryan, and why should we conform to it? 

Is Ryan referencing the wingnut "think tank," Free Enterprise Institute, and their Center for the American Idea? Ryan even says it's our "duty" to oppose everything he doesn't stand for.

But the term American Idea isn't the only ingredient in his word salad. "Popular consent" is also thrown in for good measure. Popular consent is another way of saying majority rule, which negates the Constitutional protections of the minority.

Paul Ryan's New Constitution; His path of "principled renewal" is a license to make unpopular decisions. 

Here's a little taste of Ryan's rank authoritarianism. His all-or-nothing most recent word salad path to prosperity: 
U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan today argued the American Idea “imposes a duty” to oppose programs such as Obamacare and Dodd-Frank that “subvert popular government and impose administrative rule.” 

Ryan said in a speech at Hillsdale College such government programs cannot be reformed or restructured and must either end or be “replaced by something completely different and consistent with popular consent and self-government.”

“No reform is possible without recognizing this problem. No reform is worth pursuing that does not turn against this rule and take us on the path of principled renewal.”

Ryan called for conservatives to oppose progressives’ view of administrative rule with a set of policies that comply with the Constitution. He also called for restructuring those government programs that can be saved “within the bounds of limited government.”’

“Self-government under the rule of law is the conservative touchstone,” Ryan said. “It rests upon human equality and our equal endowment with fundamental rights. It helps us identify measures that conform to the American Idea, and those that weaken or conflict with the American Idea. There’s our sure guide for reform.”